First eLearning Project? Start Here

elearning projectA lot of our website visitors come from Google and are looking into elearning for the first time. I’m sure it’s the same for many elearning companies; new clients find you because they need web-based training, but they don’t necessarily know what’s involved or how projects work. We really want people to know we’re a trusted partner that’s looking out for their best interests, so we decided to put together some guidance to help businesses tackle their first elearning projects.

To help businesses, Uncanny Owl now offers a free 7-day email course to introduce businesses to elearning projects. We don’t want to mislead businesses or sell services that don’t add significant value, so the email program we created is simply to help businesses make informed choices, whether it’s with us or with someone else. We cover whether or not elearning is the right choice, how to prepare for elearning, how to promote success, how to choose a vendor, how to manage implementations and how to measure outcomes.

If you’re a business interested in elearning, sign up below to learn more about elearning projects!


If you’re another vendor reading this blog and want to create something similar, we’re happy to provide some technical details. The sign-up form is integrated into a few pages on our website with custom code, but there are great plugins available if you have room in your sidebar. The form is linked to a Mailchimp list, which is where we set up Autoresponders to deliver staggered emails. The course content is all original; if you offer something similar, please don’t steal our lessons! :)

We hope you enjoy the course!

Captcha is the thermal port on Yahoo’s Death Star

Yahoo’s captcha system is broken.  Horrendously, tragically broken.  Today, my colleague (who holds a Master’s degree) tried to sign up for a Yahoo/Flickr account.  On the last page of the registration process, he ran into a captcha.  After about five attempts to successfully enter the code, he started to laugh and called me over.  But since I’ve only got a Bachelor’s degree, I wasn’t much help.  We would both stare at the image, try listening to the horrendously garbled audio rendition, discuss the possibilities, then submit our best guess.  Unfortunately, even with both of us straining our visual cortexes to their breaking points, it took us five more tries to finally get it right…10 attempts total.  How many people would have given up before making 10 attempts at a captcha?  I’ll give you a hint: Probably the same number of people that choose Google search over Yahoo.

I decided to go back later to try again because I really believed a company like Yahoo couldn’t screw up their registration process – something that is so vitally important to their survival.  The first time must have been a fluke.  Here’s what happened:

First Attempt:

attempt1

Looking good?  No, “Please try this code instead”:

attempt2

 

Okay, this time I must have it right.  Nope!  Wrong again!

attempt3

 

What could this possibly be if not 3G46czFpy?  Nope.

attempt4

 

This one looks like a sure thing.  Right?  Wrong again.

attempt5

 

Fifth time’s a charm?  YES!!  An improvement of 50% over our first attempts.

done

If someone can tell me what I should have entered those first 4 times to have gotten it right, please leave a message in the comments.

There are a few key lessons here:

  • Test everything.
  • User registration is important.  Don’t screw it up.
  • Even big companies sometimes fall over little (but very important) things.
  • Don’t make it hard for someone to be your customer.

Hopefully Yahoo recognizes the importance of this issue and fixes it ASAP.  Their users, employees and shareholders are counting on them.